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Leonardo Cruz
Leonardo Cruz

Dallas Buyers Club Trailer



Matthew McConaughey stars in DALLAS BUYERS CLUB as real-life Texas cowboy Ron Woodroof, whose free-wheeling life was overturned in 1985 when he was diagnosed as HIV-positive and given 30 days to live. These were the early days of the AIDS epidemic, and the U.S. was divided over how to combat the virus. Ron, now shunned and ostracized by many of his old friends, and bereft of government-approved effective medicines, decided to take matters in his own hands, tracking down alternative treatments from all over the world by means both legal and illegal. Bypassing the establishment, the entrepreneurial Woodroof joined forces with an unlikely band of renegades and outcasts - who he once would have shunned - and established a hugely successful "buyers' club." Their shared struggle for dignity and acceptance is a uniquely American story of the transformative power of resilience.




dallas buyers club trailer


Download Zip: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fjinyurl.com%2F2uhvac&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw0iaEQ1pPM8BywmwuVs68zv



With roles in films like Magic Mike, Mud, Bernie, Killer Joe, The Paperyboy and the upcoming Wolf of Wall Street, Matthew McConaughey is enjoying a low profile rejuvenation of his career with a variety of different roles, making him a sort of renaissance man. Now he's taking on another unique role in Dallas Buyers Club where he plays real-life Texas cowboy Ron Woodroof, whose life was overturned in 1985 when he was diagnosed as HIV-positive and given 30 days to live. Shunned by many of his old friends, Woodroof takes the fight against the virus into his own hands as he tries to track down alternative treatments from all over the world in a "buyers club" with other renegades and outcasts just him. Watch it!


The FDA gets a warrant to raid the buyers club but can do nothing but fine Woodroof. The FDA changes its regulations in 1987, making any unapproved drug illegal. With the club strapped for cash, Rayon begs her father for money and tells Woodroof that she has sold her life insurance policy to raise money. Woodroof travels to Mexico and gets more peptide T. Upon his return, Ron finds that Rayon has died in the hospital. Upset by Rayon's death, Saks is asked to resign when the hospital discovers she had been sending patients to the buyers club, but refuses, insisting that she will have to be fired instead.


The characters of Rayon and Dr. Eve Saks were fictional; the writers had interviewed transgender AIDS patients, activists, and doctors for the film and combined these stories to create the two composite supporting roles.[97] However, Woodroof did lose all his friends after they found out he was HIV-positive. In his interviews with Borten, Woodroof implied that this, along with interactions with gay people living with AIDS through the buyers club, led to a rethinking of his apparent anti-gay sentiments and changed his views on gay people. Other people who knew him said that he did not harbor anti-gay sentiments and was himself bisexual.[98][99] Also, while a rodeo enthusiast, he never rode any bulls himself.[100] Although the film shows Woodroof diagnosed in 1985, he told Borten that a doctor had informed him he might have had the disease well before that; Woodroof believed that he may have been infected in 1981, something that was briefly alluded to in a flashback in the film.[19]


The treatments that Woodroof did promote were less-effective at best, or at worst, dangerous. According to Staley, Woodroof became a proponent of Peptide T, a treatment which "never panned out. It's a useless therapy, and it never got approved, and nobody uses it today, but the film implies that it helped him."[105] DDC, also promoted by Woodroof, did prove to be an effective antiviral treatment, but it also proved to have worse side effects than AZT, with the potential to cause irreversible nerve damage in some cases. As a result, it was only used by doctors for a relatively short time.[105] A third treatment promoted by Woodroof, called Compound Q (Trichosanthin), was specifically linked to two deaths during trials, and therefore, was not used by doctors thereafter. Most "buyers clubs" stopped providing it as well, but Woodroof continued to dispense it, part of the reason for Woodroof's conflict with the FDA.[105] 041b061a72


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